Tag Archives: terrorismo

Attack on Museum Bardo in Tunis

Al menos ochos personas, entre ellas siete extranjeros, han muerto en un ataque terrorista en el Museo Bardo de Túnez, según anunció el Ministerio de Interior. Entre las víctimas se encuentra al menos un español.

Dos terroristas vestidos con uniformes militares han tratado esta mañana de asaltar, alrededor de las 12.30 horas, el Parlamento de Túnez y, tras un tiroteo, se han refugiado en el vecino museo, que está al lado de la sede del legislativo. Allí, los terroristas han tomado rehenes, tras herir a los guardias de seguridad del recinto. En el lugar habría unos 200 visitantes.

Un portavoz del Ministerio del Interior afirmó que hay al menos 8 turistas muertos, entre ellos españoles, franceses e italianos, según France 24h.

Según las mismas fuentes, la guardia de seguridad de la cámara se dio cuenta de que los dos uniformados no portaban armas reglamentarias y, al pedirles que se detuvieran, se desató un tiroteo durante el que los presuntos asaltantes lograron huir hacia el citado museo, uno de los más importantes de Túnez. Los asaltantes, además, habrían ocupado el edificio de la radio tunecina. Tras el asalto, el Parlamento ha procedido a evacuar a los diputados y a los periodistas que cubrían la información de la cámara.

Un funcionario de la Agencia del Patrimonio confirmó a Shems FM por teléfono que los asaltantes entraron en el museo disparando y que han tomado como rehenes a los visitantes y el personal del museo.

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Nouvelle photo des otages du musée du #Bardo … Toujours pas du confirmation sur la mort de 4 d’entre eux. #Tunisie pic.twitter.com/WsXHB21kDQ — Med Dhia Hammami (@_med_Dhia) March 18, 2015

 
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PHOTO: A Photo taken by one of the hostages in the Bardo Museum. #Tunisia #Hostage #Developing pic.twitter.com/eq07QbNmsq — News_Executive (@News_Executive) March 18, 2015

A Tunisian official says eight people have been killed in a shooting attack on a leading museum.

Interior Ministry spokesman Mohamed Ali Aroui said on Radio Mosaique that only one of the dead in Wednesday’s attack was a Tunisian. He did not provide nationalities for the others.

Tunisia-based independent journalist Elodie Auffray posted on Twitter that one man was captured by the police, but did not elaborate.

Mosaique FM also reported that about 20 to 30 tourists were still in the museum around 1 p.m. local time Wednesday afternoon (8 a.m. Toronto time).

The station said 200 tourists were inside the museum when the attack began.

The National Bardo Museum is next to the national parliament building, which was being evacuated after the shooting.

TUNISIA-POLITICS-UNREST

TUNISIA-POLITICS-UNREST

A Tunisian official says eight people have been killed in a shooting attack on a leading museum.

Interior Ministry spokesman Mohamed Ali Aroui said on Radio Mosaique that only one of the dead in Wednesday’s attack was a Tunisian. He did not provide nationalities for the others.

Tunisia-based independent journalist Elodie Auffray posted on Twitter that one man was captured by the police, but did not elaborate.

Mosaique FM also reported that about 20 to 30 tourists were still in the museum around 1 p.m. local time Wednesday afternoon (8 a.m. Toronto time).

The station said 200 tourists were inside the museum when the attack began.

The National Bardo Museum is next to the national parliament building, which was being evacuated after the shooting.

Fuentes:
La Vanguardia
Al Arabiya News
The Star World
CBS News

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Protecting Cultural Heritage from Art Theft – O cómo, según el FBI, la venta de arte robado sirve para financiar otros crímenes organizados, como los relacionados con las drogas y el terrorismo

When someone thinks of art crime, a Hollywood image is conjured, one of black-clad cat burglars and thieves in top hats and white gloves. But, the truth behind art crime, one misunderstood by the general public and professionals alike, is far more sinister and intriguing. Art crime has its share of cinematic thefts and larger-than-life characters, but it also is the realm of international organized crime syndicates, the involvement of which results in art crime funding all manner of other serious offenses, including those pertaining to the drug trade and terrorism. Art crime has shifted from a relatively innocuous, ideological crime into a major international plague.

Over the last 50 years, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has ranked art crime behind only drugs and arms in terms of highest-grossing criminal trades.1 There are hundreds of thousands of art crimes reported per year, but, despite this fact, the general public only hears about the handful of big-name museum heists that make international headlines. In Italy alone there are 20,000 to 30,000 thefts reported annually, and many more go unreported.2 In fact, even though reported art crime ranks third in the list of criminal trades, many more such incidents go unreported worldwide, rather than coming to the attention of authorities, making its true scale much broader and more difficult to estimate.

Fundamentalist terrorist groups rely on looted antiquities as a major funding source. Mohammed Atta tried to sell looted antiquities in 1999 as a funding source for the 9/11 attacks.3 In regions, such as Afghanistan, local farmers dig up treasure troves beneath the soil and sell them to local criminal or government organizations for a tiny fraction of their actual value. The antiquities then are smuggled abroad, given a false provenance, and sold, often on an open market to unsuspecting museums and collectors who never would imagine that their purchase might indirectly fund the Taliban.4 One of the most important ways to get the general public and governments alike to take art crime as seriously as it warrants is to highlight the ways in which this seemingly innocuous category of crime not only depletes and damages the world’s art and its understanding of it but also fuels the arms trade, drug trafficking, and terrorist activity.5

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